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Bosch Manufacturing Solutions

Application Areas

Suitable coating technology for numerous applications

Application Areas Coating Technology Bosch Manufacturing Solutions

Professional coatings for your applications

Different materials and locations place different demands on the coatings. Depending on the area of application, we support you with the right materials. Because only if the substrate is well protected will you benefit from your investment for a long time to come.

Electrical insulating coatings

With their high dielectric strength, it is Lacquers, silanes, ceramics and composites that are particularly suitable as coating materials for insulating layers. Ceramics and composites impress with their good temperature stability and can be used in a broad portfolio of technical products. Their good thermal conductivity also makes them the first choice, especially for high-voltage applications. Lacquers, on the other hand, are used for complex component geometries, large surfaces or high insulation values.

Ceramics Silanes Lacquers Ceramic adhesives
Dielectric strength
Ceramics
10-50 kV/mm
Silanes
-
Lacquers
1-240 kV/mm
Ceramic adhesives
9-12 kV/mm
Thermal conductivity @ RT
Ceramics
8 - 30 W/ m·K
Silanes
0,2 - 2 W/ m·K
Lacquers
0,2 – 5,5 W/ m·K
Ceramic adhesives
0,5 - 8 W/ m·K
Temperature stability
Ceramics
> 1800 °C
Silanes
Bis zu 500 °C
Lacquers
100 - 300°C, Specialities up to 800 °C
Ceramic adhesives
1200 - 2200 °C
Mechanical flexibility
Ceramics
low
Silanes
low - medium
Lacquers
medium - high
Ceramic adhesives
medium
Thik
Ceramics
0,5 µm - mm
Silanes
0,1 - 10 µm
Lacquers
5 µm – mm
Ceramic adhesives
µm –mm
Process
Ceramics
Thermal spray, anodising, PVD, CVD
Silanes
Dipping, spraying, squeegeeing
Lacquers
Dipping, spraying, squeegeeing
Ceramic adhesives
Spatulas, dipping, brushing

Corrosion protection

There are basically two types of corrosion protection: active and passive corrosion protection. With active corrosion protection, the corrosion protection layer is "sacrificed" in the event of corrosion attack for the metal to be protected. For this reason, only base metals (e.g. zinc) are used as a coating for active corrosion protection. Passive corrosion protection refers to all measures that are used to specifically “shield” a metallic component from the influence of corrosive media by applying a barrier layer (e.g. painting, nickel plating, etc.). The performance of the corrosion protection layers can be determined by suitable tests (e.g. salt spray test DIN EN ISO 9227).

Coating Active corrosion protection coatings Passive corrosion protection coatings Temporary corrosion protection coatings
Coating

Coating composition

Active corrosion protection coatings

Pure zinc

Zinc-Nickel (up to 14 % Nickel)

Zinc-Iron (0,4 -0,7 % Iron)
Passive corrosion protection coatings

Nickel, Copper, Tin, Silver, Gold

Lacquers
Temporary corrosion protection coatings

Silane-based coatings

Manganese of zinc phospahte layers
Coating

Coating thickness

Active corrosion protection coatings

4 - 50 µm

Passive corrosion protection coatings

Metallic layers: 2-20 µm

Lacquers: 10 -200 µm
Temporary corrosion protection coatings

Silane: 0,1 – ca. 10 µm

Phosphate layers: 0,3 - ca. 20 µm
Coating

Corrosion resistance

Salt spray test according to DIN EN ISO 9227 (NSS test)
Active corrosion protection coatings

Layer thickness dependent up to 200 hrs. NSS test

The corrosion resistance can be further increased by post-dip solution.
Passive corrosion protection coatings

Metallic layers: up to 200 hrs. NSS test

Lacquers: up to over 1000 hrs.
Temporary corrosion protection coatings

1 - 3 Days (Protection from ambient air)

Electronic Applications

Electronic components are usually coated with noble metals such as silver, gold, tin and palladium. In individual cases, rhodium, ruthenium and platinum are also used. All layers have good to excellent contact resistance and have good tribo-electric properties, which is particularly important for contact connections. Silver, hard gold, palladium and palladium/nickel also have good hardness to ensure sufficient abrasion resistance for contacts. In the case of electrical components that are soldered, tin and its alloys are used in addition to the possible materials.

Gold Silver Tin Palladium
Electrical conductivity (· 106 A·V−1·m−1)
Gold
45,5
Silver
61,4
Tin
8,7
Palladium
9,3
Solderability
Gold
+
Silver
+
Tin
+
Palladium
+
Al wire bondable
Gold
+
Silver
+
Tin
-
Palladium
+
Au wire bondable
Gold
+
Silver
-
Tin
-
Palladium
+
Adhesiveness
Gold
+
Silver
+
Tin
-
Palladium
+
Hardness (HV)
Gold
60 - 200
Silver
120 - 180
Tin
5 - 200
Palladium
250 - 300
Corrosion resistance
Gold
+
Silver
+
Tin
0
Palladium
+
Costs
Gold
-
Silver
0
Tin
+
Palladium
-

Wear protection

Coatings for wear protection can be produced by galvanic, thermal spray and plasma coatings, among others. Each type of coating brings with it specific properties. For example, they differ in hardness, temperature stability and wear protection efficiency. In order to provide you with the best possible protection for your products, we gather a comprehensive profile of requirements and advise you in detail on the most suitable options for you.

Chem.
Nickel
Material
Hard chrome
Chem.
Nickel
Pure chemical nickel
Hard particles
Friction reduced particles
Cu alloy (bronze)
Typical coating thickness [µm]
5 - 100
Chem.
Nickel
5 - 30
5 - 30
5 - 30
10 - 100
Hardness [HV]
900 - 1100
Chem.
Nickel
600 - 1000
700 - 1100
300 - 500
80 - 550
Operating temperature
[°C]
350
Chem.
Nickel
ca. 900
ca. 350
ca. 250
500 - 600
Coating temperature [°C]
60
Chem.
Nickel
88 - 95
88 - 95
88 - 95
max. 60
Wear protection agains
Abrasion
++
Chem.
Nickel
++
+++
+++
++
Tribochemical reaction
++
Chem.
Nickel
+
+
+
+
Adhesion
+
Chem.
Nickel
-
0
+++
+
Surface shattering
++
Chem.
Nickel
0
+
0
-
Counterbody wear
+
Chem.
Nickel
+
0
+++
+++
Corrosion resistance
++
Chem.
Nickel
++
++
++
++
Particle resistance
++
Chem.
Nickel
0
++
0
-
Reach Conform
Yes, with authorization
Chem.
Nickel
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes

Metallization of non-conductors

The metallization of non-conductors can be used to generate high-quality decorative elements from lightweight and inexpensive polymer or ceramic materials. Automotive manufacturers and suppliers in particular have great freedom in the construction and design of components through the metallization of non-conductors. In the technical field, too, there are applications for the refinement of plastic and ceramic parts, such as electromagnetic shielding or the adjustment of strength.